How to interpret your electrical installation status report?

INTRODUCTION

A Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR) is a document that assesses the safety and condition of your electrical installations. This ratio is also sometimes called a Periodic Inspection Report (PIR).

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Your electrical installation should be regularly inspected and tested by a qualified electrician to make sure he responds safety standards. The frequency of these inspections will depend on the type of property and its use. For example, a domestic property used as a primary residence may only need to be inspected every 10 yearswhile a commercial property used for commercial purposes may need to be inspected every 5 years.

The electrical installation condition report will detail the defects observed, nover-conformities standards in force and any recommendations for corrective work. It is important to understand your EICR so that you can take action to ensure the safety of your electrical installation.

WHAT IS THE EICR EXACTLY?

Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR) is sometimes called fixed wire test or periodic inspection (PIR). The report is an official document generated after a thorough examination of the fixed or hard-wired electrical system of a building or property.

WHY DO I NEED AN EICR?

The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 state that if your building or property is used for commercial, industrial, utility or any other public or non-residential purpose, you must always maintain the safety of the electrical system and obtain the electrical installation status report. This applies to all businesses, no matter the sizeincluding sole proprietorships.

Although the law does not require have a condition report of the electrical installation made. However, having a report on the condition of the electrical installation is the only way to ensure the security of the system and satisfy your legal obligations. In the event of an accident due to your electrical system, an up-to-date Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR) and/or maintenance sheets can serve as proof that you have fulfilled your legal obligations and that you are not legally responsible for the event.

WHAT ARE THE LEGAL OBLIGATIONS REGARDING ELECTRICAL TESTS?

According to Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, “Every employer shall protect, so far as practicable, the health, safety and welfare of its workers at work.”

Not only are all businesses responsible for the health and safety of their employees, but they must also protect members of the general public who enter, use, or otherwise interact with their business and premises.

In addition to this Act, the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 were issued under the Health and Safety at Work Labor Act 1974 and relate exclusively to electrical systems in the workplace.

The Electricity at Work Regulations, 1989, Regulation 3 specifies who is required to comply with the regulation:

(1) Unless specifically stated otherwise in these Rules, it is the responsibility of each–

a) the employer and the self-employed person to comply with the provisions of this regulation with regard to the elements under its control; and

(b) manager of a mine or quarry (as defined in section 180 of the Mines and Quarries Act 1954) to ensure that any requirements or prohibitions imposed by or under this regulations are complied with insofar as they relate to the mine or quarry or part of a quarry of which he is the operator and under his control.

(2) While at work, every employee is responsible for:

(a) to co-operate with his employer to the extent necessary to ensure compliance with any liability imposed on his employer by these Rules; and

(b) to comply with the terms of these Rules with respect to matters under its control.

WHAT TESTS ARE CARRIED OUT DURING THE ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION STATUS REPORT?

Several visual inspections and electrical tests are performed on all hard-wired components including outlets, lights, switches, main panels, distribution boards, air conditioning and other permanent electrical components.

First, our engineers will ensure that a complete diagram of the entire electrical system is provided, then you will receive a report on the status of the electrical installation. If one does not already exist, they will review the system to develop one.

Once the information is available, visual inspections will be performed to assess the condition of the electrical system and identify risks and hazards.

Then our highly experienced experts isolate each circuit and verify the performance and safety of permanent electrical system components.

Your Electrical Condition Report (EICR) should contain all test results and suggestions.

WHAT INFORMATION MUST CONTAIN AN ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION STATUS REPORT?

A report on the condition of the electrical installation must include:

  • Your business information and inspection details
  • Any restrictions imposed by the inspection – for example, were there inaccessible parts of the system?
  • Specifics on the type of system and the components used
  • A list of all tests performed and their results
  • An overview of the state of the system with specific observations and recommendations for necessary actions
  • Signature of the entrepreneur who passed the exams

You should carefully retain your Electrical Condition Report (EICR) and any associated documentation. In the future, new contractors and insurers or professional organizations may request your report. It is important to note that if an accident involving your electrical system occurs, your EICR can be used as evidence for defend yourself and your organization.

WHAT DO THE OBSERVATION CODES IN AN EICR MEAN?

If our engineers detect a hazard or possible hazard, they will record it in the Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR) and assign it a code based on severity.

These are the codes:

C1- ‘Danger present. Danger of injury. Urgent corrective action is required.

C2- “Potentially hazardous – immediate corrective action required”

C3- ‘Improvement suggested.’

FI – “Immediately more investigation needed”

Codes C1, C2, and FI indicate that you are failing or, in the case of FI, you may be failing to meet your legal obligations to maintain the safety of the fixed electrical system. This implies that they must be implemented quickly.

Despite the fact that C3 concerns are less serious, they pose a greater threat if left unaddressed, so it is highly recommended that they be addressed immediately.

HOW CAN I MAKE SURE THE CONTRACTOR COMPLETING MY EICR IS NOT ADDING WORK TO INCREASE THE PRICE?

Still check a contractor’s credentials and qualifications before hiring them.

To eliminate the possibility of customers being charged for unnecessary work, you can hire any competent electrical contractor to perform the tasks outlined in the Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR); you don’t have to use the same contractor who created the report.

Also, you don’t need to repeat all the Electrical Condition Report (EICR) tests after you complete the steps and fix the issues. As confirmation that the problems have been repaired, the contractor you select for the work must present you with either an Electrical Installation Certificate (EIC) or a Minor Works Certificate (MW). It’s essential that you retain these records and that you can provide them with the original Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR) as proof that you have complied with your legal obligations.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I TAKE AN EICR?

It relies on a variety of variables. We can provide you with personalized frequency recommendations to protect the security of your particular system. We will look at the type of fixed electrical system you have, and how much and how much it is used. Additionally, we will consider the amount of testing and maintenance performed to date, the age of the system, and any other factors that can affect the system.

If you know or believe that the fixed electrical system has been damaged or tampered with, you should contact us immediately to discuss the best course of action.

CONCLUSION

A Report on the state of the electrical installation is a document that assesses the safety and condition of your electrical installation. This report is also sometimes referred to as a Periodic Inspection Report (PIR). Your electrical installation should be regularly inspected and tested by a qualified electrician to ensure that it meets safety standards. The frequency of these inspections will depend on the type of property and its use.

Mara W. Anderson